News Archive

Gmitro Helps Push the Boundary of Radiology with Biophotonics

Portrait of Art GmitroBiophotonics – the development and application of optical techniques for the study of biological molecules, cells and tissue – is expanding the scope of radiology by bringing clinicians and researchers new tools for noninvasive imaging of cancer and other diseases.

Department head and professor of biomedical engineering, medical imaging and optical sciences Art Gmitro is a pioneer of the interdisciplinary field, which incorporates medicine, biology, physics, engineering, technology and more. 

“Biophotonics is somewhat like magnetic resonance: a rich technology that can measure many different things,” he said. 

Students Create Cost-Effective, Easy-to-Use Medical Device

Engineering Design Team 15024 with their project posterAn incorrectly inserted nasogastric feeding tube can lead to serious injury or death.

But a UA College of Engineering senior design team featuring four biomedical engineering students is helping to mitigate the danger.

In May, they produced a working prototype of an instrument that gives instant feedback on tube placement.

Treating Arthritis with Cartilage Grown from Stem Cells on Scaffolds

John Szivek points out arthritis damage on a bone; image courtesy of ABC 12 WJRTA technique developed by John A. Szivek, UA professor of orthopaedic surgery and biomedical engineering, may someday help arthritis patients avoid knee replacement surgery.

His research at the UA Orthopedic Research Laboratory grows cartilage from stem cells taken from fat tissue on scaffolding that mimics the structure of a normal bone.

Tracking the 'Body Electric' with Bioelectronics

Sensor contained within the Biostamp wearable device. Image courtesy of the UA Sarver Heart Center.A balloon catheter that more efficiently implants electrodes into malfunctioning hearts. A mesh cap that detects the force of blows to the head during contact sports. A stretchable, wearable real-time heart monitor.

As reported in the New Yorker and KXAS-TV news, these are just a sampling of the bioelectronic devices developed by Dr. Marvin Slepian, associate department head of biomedical engineering for clinical/industrial affairs, and his collaborators.

Armstrong Discusses Developments in Diabetes Treatment

Portrait of David ArmstrongDr. David Armstrong, professor of surgery, public health and biomedical engineering at the University of Arizona, discussed the diabetes epidemic in the United States, its impact on public heath and his work leading the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance in a recent radio interview on the Buckmaster Show.

His segment runs from 30 minutes, 30 seconds to 41 minutes in the program.

Zeroing in on Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

Jennifer Barton in the labProfessor of biomedical engineering and interim director of the BIO5 Institute Jennifer Barton is leading a two-year, $1 million project funded by the National Cancer Institute to identify imaging biomarkers of ovarian cancer, the most deadly gynecological cancer in the United States. This work may enable the first effective screening system for what is often called a “silent killer” of women.

“Our goal is to identify biomarkers at the earliest possible stage of ovarian cancer to build a viable optical imaging technology that will enable early detection and save lives,” said Barton.

Fink Recognized for STEM Diversity Efforts

Eugenia Anane-Wae and Ty'Dria White accept the 2016 University Excellence in STEM Diversity Award on Wolfgang Fink's behalf. Photo courtesy of the UA Women in Science and Engineering ProgramAssociate professor Wolfgang Fink was honored by the UA Women in Science and Engineering Program with the 2016 University Excellence in STEM Diversity award, which recognizes a faculty or staff member who goes above and beyond in encouraging interest and diversity in science, technology, engineering or math fields.

Fink advises the UA chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers. In 2014, he led an undergraduate team of NSBE members to victory in a national robotic pipeline inspection competition, and then helped them publish their findings as a scientific paper.

Photo courtesy of WISE. Eugenia Anane-Wae and Ty’Dria White, officers of the UA NSBE, accepted the award on Fink's behalf.

Congrats, Grads!

BME Class of 2016 standing on the steps of the Center for Creative Photography in caps and gowns

It's taken hard work, and good work, and occasionally fun work, but the Class of 2016 has reached the finish line!

Several BME faculty members in regalia smile for a selfie

BME's faculty and staff are proud of your many accomplishments.

Check out the BME Facebook Page for all the Pre-Commencement pics.

And please keep in touch! We're always interested in alumni news for the website and newsletter.

Recognizing Outstanding Students

Department Head Art Gmitro shakes Tyler Toth's hand as he crosses the stage at BME's convocation ceremonyTyler Toth has been named spring 2016 Outstanding Senior for the department of biomedical engineering. His recent accolades include Most Creative Research at BME Design Day, an NSF graduate research fellowship and the Raytheon Award for Best Overall Design alongside his teammates at Engineering Design Day.

Molly Keenan was selected as the spring 2016 BME GIDP Outstanding Graduate Student.

BME Senior a Legacy of Maria Teresa Velez

David Maestas demonstrating his project at Engineering Design Day 2015. Photo by Raymond Sanchez/UANews.David Maestas had a difficult time imagining himself as a graduate student. However, thanks to the guidance of the late Maria Teresa Velez, he was accepted into the top-ranked biomedical engineering PhD program at Johns Hopkins University.

Velez, who served as associate dean of the UA Graduate College until she passed away in April, dedicated her career to supporting underrepresented and first-generation students, including members of the BME community.

Photo by Raymond Sanchez/UANews

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